Studentships

Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) works with a number of University partners to train tomorrow’s leaders in Environmental Science.  These collaborations, known as Doctoral Training Partnerships (DTPs), offer postgraduate studentships and training across the full range of multidisciplinary environments, helping to enrich the student experience.

Each DTP will create a strong and active community of students that are able - and encouraged - to integrate, work, and learn together. Students will receive in-depth, advanced research training, as well as training in the professional and transferable skills essential in today's economy.
Saskia Ruhl (PhD student) filtering seawater onboard the Plymouth Quest research vessel

PML is a multidisciplinary, internationally renowned, strategic marine research centre. For 2018 we have a number of prestigious and exciting opportunities for outstanding students wishing to conduct PhD projects in our five areas of research excellence: Earth observation and remote sensing; biogeochemical cycling; biodiversity and molecular science; marine ecosystem modelling; and socioeconomics of ecosystem goods and services.

These PhD opportunities are developed with partners from 3 DTPs. Further details on each partnership can be found here:

  • GW4+ (with the Universities of Bristol, Bath, Exeter and Cardiff)
  • Spitfire (with the University of Southampton)
  • EnvEast (with the Universities of East Anglia, Kent and Essex)
 


Monitoring Arctic ocean acidification from space using satellite Earth Observations

Montage of satellite, arctic and research ship

Plymouth Marine Laboratory and the University of Exeter are inviting applications for a fully-funded PhD studentship to commence in September/October 2018 or as soon as possible thereafter. For eligible students the studentship will cover UK/EU tuition fees plus an annual tax-free stipend of at least £14,777 for 3.5 years full-time study. 

Background

About one third of the CO2 released into the atmosphere by anthropogenic activity since the Industrial revolution has been taken up by the oceans, resulting in a shift in marine carbonate chemistry, including a decrease in seawater pH and carbonate ion concentration; a situation referred to as ‘Ocean Acidification’ (OA). The majority of scientific efforts to-date for monitoring, observing and predicting the effects of OA have focused on using models and in situ studies (such as buoys, research cruises and laboratory- or field-based studies). Satellite Earth Observation (EO) has yet to be fully exploited in this area of research, but could play an important role in monitoring changes in oceanic carbonate chemistry, as well as assessing vulnerable regions, as they can provide quasi-synoptic, reproducible and well-calibrated measurements. A recent European Space Agency pilot project 'Pathfinders Ocean Acidification’ highlighted this approach (Land et al. 2015) and then established that satellite observations can in fact reproduce carbonate parameters with accuracy comparable to in situ or model-driven approaches. However, the Pathfinders-OA project also highlighted some regions where the empirical algorithms underperformed and further development is needed, including the Arctic Ocean.

Find out more information here 

How to apply

Please send a cover letter and CV to humanresourcesgroup@pml.ac.uk

Deadline for applications 31st August 2018. Interviews will take place mid-September.

Logos from the partnership

For any enquiries please contact HumanResourcesGroup@pml.ac.uk. Why not follow our Twitter feed or Facebook page for announcements of any new opportunities.