AMT cruise at South Georgia

Celebrating 20 years of the Atlantic Meridional Transect

 

​We are delighted to announce a special issue of Progress in Oceanography, celebrating 20 years of the Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT).

Established in 1995, AMT is a well-respected multi-disciplinary programme, and now part of the Natural Environment Research Council funded National Capability, that undertakes biological, chemical and physical oceanographic research during an annual voyage between the UK and destinations in the South Atlantic. This enables scientists to make open ocean observations through a wide latitudinal range, including the rarely sampled north and south Atlantic gyres. The AMT cruise programme is unique, provides an outstanding platform for interdisciplinary research, and works towards a greater understanding of the ocean and the biogeochemistry within it.

The special issue is a collection of 16 original research articles, providing a wealth of knowledge from over two decades of observations.

“This collection, which covers 20 years of research activity in the greater Atlantic Ocean, ranges from oceanographic conditions to insight into ecosystem variables,” said Dr Andy Rees, part of PML’s Marine Biogeochemistry and Ocean Observations group, and manager of the AMT programme since 2007. “The AMT special issue therefore presents the state of the art in our current understanding of the function of the Atlantic Ocean.”

 

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