New modelling tool to enhance global understanding

New modelling tool to enhance global understanding

 

Open access model allows scientists to predict climate and other anthropogenically influenced environmental changes.

Today sees the release of the open-source Shelf Seas Biogeochemistry programme-ERSEM model, as a modelling tool for the marine science community.

ERSEM (the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model) is a numerical representation of an ecological system, studied to gain understanding of the real-life system. It is designed to simulate carbon and nutrient cycling and ecosystem response in European shelf seas and beyond. This enables scientists to make predictions about future conditions and changes within the Earth system under anthropogenic influences and climate change. 

PML was not only part of the original consortium which developed ERSEM, but has since led the development of the original model, finding applications in a number of fields. Working in collaboration with the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) and the UK Met Office, this version brings together aspects of ERSEM developments made at PML, Cefas and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ).

By making the model open access and freely available to all (including full documentation), the scientists involved hope to foster collaborations within the scientific community, as well as improve transparency and sharing on a global scale. It will also allow PML scientists to monitor ERSEM’s user base, providing adequate and rapid support, whilst enabling them to assess and increase its impact in order to further enhance and refine the model. 

The open access model is being made available through the Shelf Seas Biogeochemistry programme, which is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council and the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra). The aim of the programme is to reduce the uncertainty in our understanding of nutrient and carbon cycling within the shelf seas, and of their overall role in global biogeochemical cycles.

Other recent news articles

News

Dr Tony Stebbing, BSc (Hons), PhD - In Memoriam

Dr Anthony (Tony) Stebbing sadly passed away on the 2nd May from Covid-19 following a prolonged illness. Tony was aged 78 years and is survived by his wife Valerie.

News

Virtual Ocean Dialogues

The first ever completely virtual global conference for ocean action, the Virtual Ocean Dialogues, took part (1-5 June) with Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) a co-host of the ‘Deep Dive’ session on Ocean Acidification and Climate - Ocean Impacts.

News

Satellites powering global science

A new study co-ordinated by PML highlights the accuracy of satellite observations of elevation over a range of water and ice surfaces, supporting crucial research into climate, sea level rise and water supply across the globe.