Strengthening marine observations

Long-term observations of the marine environment are imperative to enable us to see how the marine environment is changing and to provide a baseline for projections of how it may change into the future.  PML has a long standing network of in situ observations, from the Western Channel Observatory in the western English Channel to the Atlantic Meridional Transect sampling the length of the Atlantic Ocean each year.  However, it is not possible to sample the entire global ocean and PML is at the forefront of utilising remote sensing platforms including satellite and aircraft observations to conduct research on the physical and ecological processes in oceanic, coastal and inland waters.
 
Gas bubbles in the ocean

Carbon and nutrient cycles

The ocean plays a dominant role in the Earth’s carbon and nutrient cycles.  These cycles are intrinsically linked together and sustain...

A view of the top of earth from space

Earth Observation

Remote sensing obtains information about the ocean from a distance, usually from satellites or aircraft, and can be used to measure a wide variety...

Yellow data buoy at sea

New technologies

In the coming decades the Earth system will have to address two fundamental challenges: managing global environmental change and providing...

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News

Celebrating 20 years of the Atlantic Meridional Transect

​We are delighted to announce a special issue of Progress in Oceanography, celebrating 20 years of the Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT).

News

Enhancing the value of biogeochemical simulations through integrating ocean observations and models

PML/National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO) scientists have generated the first-ever long-term reanalysis simulation of the biogeochemical conditions in the northwest European shelf, highlighting the importance of measuring uncertainty in these indicators, in order to be...

News

22M invested in major research programme on the Atlantic Ocean

A new £22 million research programme will investigate the impacts of climate change and human activities on the Atlantic Ocean, from the surface to the deep seabed.

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