COP23

Oceans of Impact - PML at COP23

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Nearly 200 nations of the world are currently meeting at the UN Climate Change Conference (UNFCCC COP23) in Bonn, with the focus on advancing the aims and ambitions of the 2015 Paris Agreement and achieve progress on its implementation guidelines. 

Fiji, the country presiding over COP23, has included in its COP23 vision ”to draw a stronger link between the health of the world’s oceans and seas and the impacts of, and solutions to, climate change as part of a holistic approach to the protection of our planet”. 

PML has been an active participator in the UN Climate Change meetings since 2009, a role it will continue this year, by bringing together international partners, providing evidence based science on the impact of change and future options for the ocean and society.

You can meet our PML team on their stand “Oceans of Impact” or during our side events (full list here), including the high level Oceans Action Day, where PML is a collaborator on the event, or the EU Oceans Day where PML is leading a session.

Not in Bonn? You can follow our side event live on Sunday 12 November, 16:45 CET at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSbUPgmmKUTzRmspKM9DpuQ.
 
You may also be interested in reading the dedicated Oceans of Impact handout developed especially for COP23 which can be found here.   

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