Steve, Thomas and Louise

Generous donation plots course for new apprentice

 

​PML is delighted to announce the arrival of a new apprentice, Thomas Mesher, who is embarking on training to gain the experience and knowledge necessary for a career in marine science.

During his time at PML Thomas will be learning a wide range of skills relating to sea-going fieldwork and analytical laboratory techniques. Working with the Marine Ecology and Biodiversity research group, the Western Channel Observatory, and the Changing Arctic Oceans programme, Thomas will be learning how to collect and identify seabed fauna using a variety of remote sampling equipment. He will also be working on samples from a range of locations and habitats, and learning how to analyse data to identify changes and patterns in marine ecosystem community structure and biodiversity.

The apprenticeship is funded by an incredibly generous donation; we wish to thank the anonymous benefactor who kindly donated £20,000 to PML via the Charities Aid Foundation.

“We’re looking forward to Thomas getting started,” said Prof. Steve Widdicombe, Head of Science for Marine Ecology and Biodiversity at PML. “Our previous apprentices have been a huge success, and these apprenticeships represent a great way of training the next generation of marine scientists. I’m sure Thomas is going to really enjoy helping us to study the marine life of some fascinating stretches of water, and he’ll amass a wealth of knowledge and experience in the process.”
 

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