Discovery on the AMT research cruise

The 27th AMT cruise embarks

 

The 27th Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) research cruise has departed from Southampton, with PML scientists on-board and spending 6 weeks sailing the Atlantic.

AMT is an interdisciplinary scientific programme that undertakes biological, chemical and physical oceanographic research during an annual voyage between the UK and destinations in the South Atlantic. This journey crosses a range of marine ecosystems from sub-polar to tropical and from shelf seas and upwelling systems to mid-ocean gyres.

This year’s cruise includes a number of scientists from PML, including Lloyd’s Register Foundation apprentice Rebecca May. They are joined by collaborators from the University of Southampton, the Naturalis Biodiversity Centre of the Netherlands, the University of Warwick, and the University of Hawaii, working on a diverse range of projects. Also on board are two visiting research fellows funded by the Partnership for Observation of the Global Ocean (POGO) and the Nippon Foundation.

“I’m excited to explore and learn new techniques, working with PML’s Dr Andy Rees on estimation of dissolved and atmospheric greenhouse gases, which is the topic of the moment!” said POGO-funded fellow, Cristabel Fernandes of India’s National Institute of Oceanography.

“The AMT cruise means a lot to me,” said Nippon Foundation-funded fellow Hashan Niroshana Kokuhennadige, of the University of Ruhuna. “This kind of opportunity to learn from trained personnel and gain on-board experience with high-tech oceanographic equipment is rarely available in Sri Lanka, and I’m looking forward to sharing the skills and knowledge I gain with my students.”

Both visiting fellows have already spent some time at PML receiving training ahead of the cruise and will return to PML for up to a month after the cruise to work on the data collected.

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